O’Hare Airport Boasts New Ultra Accessible Restroom

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Accessible restroom sign

Accessible restroom sign

Chicago’s O’Hare airport has been getting some bad press lately, with the recent United wheelchair incident; however there’s also  some good access news coming out of the Windy City’s popular airport. Continue reading

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Hong Kong Airlines Denies Passage to Solo Wheelchair Passenger

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airplane cockpitEarly this month Hong Kong Airlines denied passage to a wheelchair-user who was traveling alone. Twenty-two year old Shen Chengqing was scheduled to travel from Hong Kong to Tianjin, but airport staff refused to check her in when they discovered she was traveling solo. According to Chengqing, she notified the reservation agent that she used a wheelchair when she bought her ticket.

So what happened? Continue reading

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Clean Up in Aisle 5!

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1689934The day started out as a typical travel day for Matthew Meehan. That is until he boarded his Delta flight from Atlanta to Miami on November 1, 2018. As he settled into his seat he noticed an unpleasant odor, but it wasn’t until he reached underneath it to retrieve his errant charger that he discovered the source. Continue reading

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DOT to Address Emotional Support Animal Issue

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airplane_landing_199029As the result of the passage of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Reauthorization Act of 2018, it looks like the Department of Transportation (DOT) is set to address the emotional support animal issue in 2019. Continue reading

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Airline Organization Urges DOT to Redefine “Service Animal”

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New Service Animal FAQs from the DOJ

Airlines for America (AIA) — an airline industry group — recently announced that it had submitted a 222-page document to the Department of Transportation (DOT), in response to a call for input on possible revisions to the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA). The group’s response included the suggestion that the DOT narrow the definition of “service animal” to “trained dogs that perform a task or work for an individual with a disability.” The document also included the recommendation that airlines should not be required to allow emotional support animals (ESOs) on board. Continue reading

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