Come on DOT – Let’s Talk ESAs!

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airplane window

Well it happened again last month – another emotional support animal (ESA) misbehaved on a flight. This isn’t news, as it seems to be the norm these days. Pretty much anyone can go online and purchase “ESA credentials” so they can fly free with their pets. Just google “emotional support animal credentials” and you’ll get a listing of what I call “card mills” that – for a price — provide certificates, vests and other accessories that will allow your dog to accompany you anywhere. Continue reading

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Clean Up in Aisle 5!

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1689934The day started out as a typical travel day for Matthew Meehan. That is until he boarded his Delta flight from Atlanta to Miami on November 1, 2018. As he settled into his seat he noticed an unpleasant odor, but it wasn’t until he reached underneath it to retrieve his errant charger that he discovered the source. Continue reading

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National Corvette Museum Clearly Defines “Service Animal” — Let’s Hope Other Businesses Follow Suit!

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450px-Emmet_Practices_Opening_a_Power_DoorIt’s no secret that we’re seeing an increase in service animals and emotional support animals here in the US. There are many reasons for this, but the “card mills” which sell service animal certifications, leashes and vests on the internet have definitely helped increase the number of pets that now “claim” service animal status. And for what it’s worth – save your money, as no certifications are required in the US; in fact it’s illegal to ask for them. Continue reading

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Airline Organization Urges DOT to Redefine “Service Animal”

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New Service Animal FAQs from the DOJ

Airlines for America (AIA) — an airline industry group — recently announced that it had submitted a 222-page document to the Department of Transportation (DOT), in response to a call for input on possible revisions to the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA). The group’s response included the suggestion that the DOT narrow the definition of “service animal” to “trained dogs that perform a task or work for an individual with a disability.” The document also included the recommendation that airlines should not be required to allow emotional support animals (ESOs) on board. Continue reading

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Delta Airlines Nixes Pit Bulls as Service Animals

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airplane_landing_199029Delta Airlines recently announced that it will no longer accept pit bull type dogs as service dogs or emotional support animals, beginning July 10, 2018. Additionally there will be a limit of one emotional support animal per passenger. Apparently this new policy is the direct result of several employees being bitten by service dogs or emotional support animals. Continue reading

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Airlines Tighten Leash on Emotional Support Animals

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peacockIn response to a New York artist’s failed attempt to pass off her pet peacock (Dexter) as an emotional support animal on a recent United Airlines flight, the airline responded by tightening their emotional support animal policies beginning on March 1, 2018. Continue reading

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Florida Law Addresses “Fake” Service Animals

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trooperIn June of last year the Florida State Legislature amended CS/HB 71 on service animals, to reflect changes in the Americans with Disabilities Act and to update the language. The law took effect on July 1, 2015. Most of the changes were innocuous, however there are two interesting additions to the law. Continue reading

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So How Did The Turkey Get on the Airplane?

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turkey-1By now I’m sure you’ve heard the story about the turkey that traveled on Delta Airlines in the passenger compartment as an emotional support animal (ESA). Not only did the privileged bird travel in comfort class, but he also got wheelchair assistance through the airport. And although the internet is all abuzz with photos and hash-tags about the incident, I think the more important issue here is — how did the turkey get on the airplane? Continue reading

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Service Animal or Pet? How to Ferret Out The Truth

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Legitimate service animals are trained to perform specific tasks for their disabled handlers

Legitimate service animals are trained to perform specific tasks for their disabled handlers

Although I generally direct my tips to consumers, I’m going to change things up a bit and reach out to folks in customer service today. Lately there has been a lot of buzz about “fake” service animals, otherwise known as pets. And to be honest, the fakers really do a huge disservice to people who have legitimate service animals. Continue reading

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