French Court Fines easyJet Again

Once again France has stepped in to remedy access problems caused by British budget air carrier easyJet. In response to a criminal complaint filed by Joseph Etcheveste, last month a French court fined the air carrier €60,000 for their failure to allow the plaintiff to board his 2010 flight from Biarritz. Mr. Etcheveste is a wheelchair-user who was traveling unaccompanied, and according to easyJet, that was a “security problem”. Continue reading

Uber Charts a Different Accessible Course in San Francisco

Last December ride-share giant Uber rolled out an accessible ride program in Washington DC. On the surface it seemed like a good idea, as they partnered with wheelchair-accessible cabs in the District to provide services to wheelchair-users. As I pointed out in a previous blog though, this might not be the most sustainable approach. Continue reading

UAL to Implement Measures to Improve Service for Disabled Passengers

airplane_landing_199029As the result of a consent decree executed on Jan 7, 2016, United Airlines (UAL) is required to invest $650,000 to improve their services for disabled passengers. The decree resulted from an investigation of passenger complaints of a failure to enplane, deplane and transfer wheelchair-users in a timely manner at Houston International Airport , Chicago O’Hare International Airport, Denver International Airport, Newark International Airport, and Dulles International Airport. Continue reading

French Court Rules Against easyJet

It what could be considered a case of karmic justice last week, a French judge found easyJet guilty of discrimination, for denying passage to three disabled passengers in 2008 and 2009. It’s long been the British air carrier’s contention that if you can’t walk unassisted to the emergency exit, then you can’t fly without a companion. They claim it’s a matter of health and safety. Continue reading