Spooktacular Halloween Program at Yosemite Cemetery

Headstone in Yosemite Cemetery

Headstone in Yosemite Cemetery

If your Halloween travels include a stop in Yosemite National Park, then don’t miss the spooktacular ranger program at Yosemite Cemetery on October 30 and 31, 2016. The hour-long walking tour includes historical – and sometimes creepy – stories about some of the people buried in the cemetery, which dates back to the 1870s. After the tour, more stories will be shared by the campfire at the Yosemite Valley Indian Cultural Museum.

The Yosemite Cemetery is located across the street from the Yosemite Valley Indian Cultural Museum. Accessible street parking is located nearby. Alternatively, the lift-equipped park shuttle stops at the Yosemite Valley Visitor Center, which is just a short level walk from the museum. The hard-packed dirt paths through the cemetery are level, and although there are a few bumps near the entrance, they are navigable for most wheelchair-users and slow walkers. There are also benches to sit and rest along the way.

Two programs are held each night – one begins at 8:00, and the other begins at 9:00. Both sessions are appropriate for children, and they begin at the campfire at the Yosemite Valley Indian Cultural Museum. Participants are reminded to dress warm and bring a flashlight. For more information, call (209) 372-1153.

Have a great Halloween at the Yosemite Cemetery!I

Soaking Up Some Wild West History in Southern Wyoming

Rock Springs Historical Museum

Rock Springs Historical Museum

Sometimes road trips don’t go exactly as planned, but that’s all part of the adventure. Lets’ just say that’s how we ended up in Rock Springs, WY. To be honest, before our visit I gave very little thought to this Southern Wyoming town. but after a “less-than-accurate” weather forecast, Rock Springs became our unexpected home for the night. Continue reading

Five Fun Accessible National Park Finds

Accessible trail to the base of Lower Yosemite Falls

OK, I admit it, I’m a national park junkie. I love visiting them and writing about them; in fact, I’m currently working on my third national park title. One of the great things about our national parks is that even though many of them are rugged, they still offer accessible options for wheelchair-users and slow walkers. And so with the 99th anniversary of the National Park Service (NPS) coming up on August 25, I thought I’d share some of my favorite accessible sites in America’s national parks Continue reading

Five Free Wheelchair-Accessible Glass Installations in Tacoma

Chihuly at Tacoma’s Union Station

When you go to Tacoma, you have to visit the Museum of Glass. That’s a given. But that’s not the only glass in the city. It’s time to think outside the box a bit and take a little walking tour to explore some of the hidden glass treasures of Tacoma. The good news is, all these sites are free; and the even better news is that they are all wheelchair-accessible. Continue reading