Looking for a Hotel with a Ceiling Track Lift?

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Finding an accessible hotel room can sometimes be a chore, but imagine trying to find one with a ceiling track lift. Now if you live in the US you may be surprised to learn that such accommodations exist; however they are more common over in the UK. And that’s because of CHuC – the Ceiling Hoist Users Club. Thanks to their advocacy they have encouraged many properties to install ceiling track lifts. And they created a website that lists them all at www.chuc.org.uk.

This handy resource lists properties by location, and includes useful details – like if you need to provide your own sling – about the listing. The bulk of the hotels, self catering properties and B&Bs are located in the UK, but there are also a few in the US, Mexico, Australia and Continental Europe. There’s also a spot for visitors to leave comments or reviews about the listed properties.

Sadly the founder of this site passed away in 2008, but thankfully her works lives on today. So check out this site if you’d like to stay in a property with a ceiling track lift – especially if your travels will take you to the UK.

 

 

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Who Should Use the Disabled Loo?

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restroomI have to admit that I was a little puzzled by a news item that I ran across last week about a grass roots campaign in the UK to make it “more comfortable” for people with invisible disabilities to use the accessible toilets there. Apparently when seemingly able-bodied people walk out of the accessible NKS toilets across the pond, they are getting “the look” or an audible “tsk-tsk” from passers-by. To alleviate this, there is a push to change the symbol on the accessible toilets from the standard wheelchair pictogram, to a pictogram of wheelchair with two able-bodied people. OK, that part made perfect sense to me, as there certainly are folks with invisible disabilities who need accessible facilities. Continue reading

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Thompson Holidays Drops the Ball on Accessibility

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Matt Anderson had every reason to believe his Cape Verde vacation would be a relaxing retreat for him and his partner Shelly Grainger. After all, Anderson booked a wheelchair-accessible room through Thompson Holidays. The British travel operator was quick to take Anderson’s £2,800, but when the couple arrived in Africa they were informed that the accessible room was only “requested” and not “reserved” for him. Continue reading

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UK Supreme Court Weighs in on Buggy vs. Wheelchair Issue

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The UK Supreme Court ruled last month on a pivotal disability rights issue regarding the use of allocated wheelchair spaces on buses. The case stemmed from a 2012 incident in Leeds, where wheelchair-user Doug Paulley tried to board a FirstGroup bus, but a mother with a stroller who was occupying the wheelchair space refused to move. In spite of the signage that clearly states that the seats are reserved for disabled passengers, the driver would only request — not require — that she move. Ultimately Mr. Paulley was left at the curb. Continue reading

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What Does Brexit Mean for Accessible Travel?

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With Britons voting to exit the European Union, I’ve had quite a few questions about what this means for disabled travelers. And although I don’t have a crystal ball, I can see at least one area that might possibly be in line for a change – air travel. Continue reading

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Alarming Story on UK Public Transport

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As I was browsing through the Daily Mail today, one headline immediately caught my eye — “Disabled Terrified to Travel on Public Transport Because of Rising Abuse from Consumers.” I couldn’t believe what I was reading, and initially I thought that it must be some sort of proofing mistake. But as I read the full article, I discovered that sadly, that wasn’t the case. Continue reading

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